The lack of women in cybersecurity puts us all at greater risk

Women are highly underrepresented in the field of cybersecurity. In 2017, women’s share in the U.S. cybersecurity field was 14%, compared to 48% in the general workforce.

The problem is more acute outside the U.S. In 2018, women accounted for 10% of the cybersecurity workforce in the Asia-Pacific region, 9% in Africa, 8% in Latin America, 7% in Europe and 5% in the Middle East.

Women are even less well represented in the upper echelons of security leadership. Only 1% of female internet security workers are in senior management positions.

I study online crime and security issues facing consumers, organizations and nations. In my research, I have found that internet security requires strategies beyond technical solutions. Women’s representation is important because women tend to offer viewpoints and perspectives that are different from men’s, and these underrepresented perspectives are critical in addressing cyber risks.

Perception, awareness, and

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This young, Black, female scientist from NC leads efforts to find a COVID-19 vaccine

As a teenager growing up in Hillsborough, Kizzmekia Corbett had never seen a Black scientist before. Then she walked into a lab at UNC-Chapel Hill one summer, met Albert Russell, a PhD student, and for the first time believed she could be one.

Now, at 34, Corbett is the scientific lead for the government’s search for a coronavirus vaccine at the National Institutes of Health.

“It made all the difference, I’m probably here because of that,” Corbett said. “Just knowing that it was possible.”

She’s become that example that she never saw and is now an assurance to other inquisitive, smart girls with an interest in science that anything is possible.

Corbett is a young, Black woman in a sea of older, white men in suits and lab coats. She’s making appearances on national TV as a scientific expert, briefing President Donald Trump about potential COVID-19 vaccines and working on

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Unemployment rates of new graduates are highest among law and computer science students, data shows

Nearly one in ten graduates of some universities are still unemployed 15 months after leaving higher education
Nearly one in ten graduates of some universities are still unemployed 15 months after leaving higher education

Unemployment rates of new graduates are highest among law and computer science students, official data shows.

Just five per cent of British graduates of the two subjects were unemployed 15 months after graduating, according to figures published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (Hesa).

Overall, nearly one in ten graduates of some universities are still unemployed 15 months after leaving higher education.

Of young people leaving full-time undergraduate courses in the summer of 2018, around 4 per cent were out of work more than a year after leaving university which rises to ten per cent at some institutions.

London’s School of Oriental and African Studies (Soas) had the highest proportion (9 per cent) of graduates out of work after leaving full-time courses, once significant interim study was excluded.

The survey, which looked at

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Wantagh-Seaford Voter Guide: NY Primary Election 2020

WANTAGH, NY — Amid lingering public health concerns over the coronavirus, Wantagh and Seaford voters who didn’t already cast ballots will head to the polls Tuesday to do just that in the Congressional primary, as well as in state senate and assembly elections.

Many New York Democrats will pay close attention to the number of votes that former Vice President Joe Biden earns in the presidential primary compared to U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who dropped out of the race earlier this year. The state Board of Elections tried to cancel the primary election, but federal judges had it reinstated. While Biden is the presumptive Democratic nominee, the primary also dictates which delegates are chosen, which could ultimately impact the party’s rules and platform.

But most will be far more concerned with what happens to U.S. Rep. Pete King’s seat. The longtime Seaford Republican shocked Long Island in

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