St. Raymond School students place second in Academic Decathlon


by Nancy Closs on March 25, 2021

Students from St. Raymond School placed second overall in the Archdiocese of San Francisco California Catholic Schools Academic Junior High Decathlon competition.

Students in grades 6-8 from schools throughout the Archdiocese of San Francisco competed in the Academic Decathlon held earlier this month

The Academic Decathlon consists of two team events: A logic quiz with 20 rigorous thinking problems and a super quiz with 50 multiple choice questions covering five broad academic themes. St. Raymond School placed third in the super quiz and second in the logic quiz.

There are also eight individual events testing knowledge of Roman Catholic doctrine, English, literature, science, mathematics, current events, social studies and fine arts. St. Raymond students placed in five of these eight events. Bella Svanberg placed 3rd in Fine Arts, Grace Urban placed 2nd in Science, Ryan Karr placed 1st in Literature, Emma Kane placed

Read More

Why A Revolution Is Needed In The Management Of Education

Figure 1

There could hardly be anything more important for the future of the country than the strength of its education system. Yet by almost every measure, our schools are not delivering what is needed. The ongoing revolution in industrial-era management to 21st century management in the corporate world has yet to reach the education sector.

An obvious symptom of the problem can be found in the fact that in 2006, only 43% school personnel in the US were teachers, while in other countries, that percentage was 70 to 80%. The Fordham Institute reports, “Non-teaching staff grew by 130% between 1970 and 2010, while student enrollment grew by 8.6%.” This imbalance is driven by a compliance focus that affects school-personnel hiring. Many staff are hired to monitor and comply with federal and state requirements. Others may be administrators, clerical staff,

Read More

A Video Game Makes Math And English Classes A Full-Body Experience

Dance parties, movement breaks and jumping around are a typical part of many pre-K classrooms. But jumping about isn’t just a way to get the wiggles out in Greenburgh Central School District, in a suburb of New York City.

Kids here are learning critical math and English skills through an online platform, called Kinems. Similar to a Nintendo Wii, the platform uses motion-based sensors and allows touchless interaction, enabling kids to control an avatar on the screen by moving their bodies.

Miriam Figueroa, a pre-K teacher in the district, said the physical activity combined with a virtual world with bright colors and animated characters is engaging, even for the shyest students, and also for students who struggle with learning differences such as ADHD, dyslexia, dyspraxia and autism.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

The whole-body engagement is especially important to her students, nearly all of whom are in special education.

Read More