Researchers develop robots that can work independently but cooperatively — ScienceDaily

To train robots how to work independently but cooperatively, researchers at the University of Cincinnati gave them a relatable task: move a couch.

If you’ve ever helped someone move furniture, you know it takes coordination — simultaneously pushing or pulling and reacting based on what your helper is doing. That makes it an ideal problem to examine collaboration between robots, said Andrew Barth, a doctoral student in UC’s College of Engineering and Applied Science.

“It’s a good metaphor for cooperation,” Barth said.

In the Intelligent Robotics and Autonomous Systems Lab of UC aerospace engineering professor Ou Ma, student researchers developed artificial intelligence to train robots to work together to move a couch — or in this case a long rod that served as a stand-in — around two obstacles and through a narrow door in computer simulations.

“We made it a little more difficult on ourselves. We want to accomplish

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Smart Buildings More Popular in Education than Before Pandemic — Campus Technology

Research

Smart Buildings More Popular in Education than Before Pandemic

In a recent global survey, two-thirds of school and college facilities managers (65 percent) were more likely to invest in smart building solutions now than they were pre-pandemic. However, no single smart building investment dominated. The top choice, among 38 percent of respondents, would be an app showing real-time building “health” information. That was followed by software providing better insight into fire systems (cited by 35 percent), and cybersecurity products and contactless building entry, both mentioned by 33 percentof survey participants.

The survey was undertaken on behalf of Honeywell Building Technologies and involved education facilities people in four countries: the United States, China, Germany and Saudi Arabia.

Four in 10 respondents (42 percent) said their facilities had experienced a physical site intrusion or cybersecurity breach during the previous year. Almost half (47 percent)

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More than a game: new tools make learning Inuktitut interactive

Inuktitut just became more interactive with the arrival of new language-learning tools.

These tools, developed by two literacy and digital learning advocates, consist of a typing game, digitized and animated learning books, and a program for teachers to design their own language learning games. They were released Aug. 5.

Iqalliarluk is a digital typing game with a goal to type specific Inuktitut words or phrases. Words are displayed in the centre of screen while in the background a man stands over a frozen body of water looking for fish.

The second tool, Uqalimaarluk, is three online books that have animation, narration and sound effects.

Last is the Inuktitut Digital Literacy Game Engine, which allows teachers to create their own simplified language learning games for students. The tool is designed to fit within a teacher’s curriculum.

The tools come from a partnership between the Pinnguaq Association and Ilitaqsiniq, also known as

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Heels, Hopes and Higher Education fundraiser returns

ASHWAUBENON (NBC 26) — Although women make up around half the U.S. population, only around eight percent of CEOs at fortune 500 companies in 2021 are women. Some local ladies are working to change that statistic.

In 1983, 13 women came together to form Management Women, an organization that now has almost 100 members.

“The whole idea was to bring women to share their experiences and their triumphs, challenges, from a work perspective,” said Lori O’Connor, past president of Management Women. “Bring those together so they could share ideas and experiences.”

20 years later, the organization’s Heels, Hopes and Higher Education fundraiser has raised nearly $400,000 in scholarship money for local women.

“Every dollar goes back to women,” said O’Connor. “So by attending, you’re helping build the future leaders of our community.”

The all-day event this year includes educational speaker Kelly Thompson, a silent auction, raffle buckets and more;

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