Rationed Covid tests for select few

An almost empty test facility in Guildford, Surrey, yesterday lunchtime - CHRIS GORMAN/BIG LADDER
An almost empty test facility in Guildford, Surrey, yesterday lunchtime – CHRIS GORMAN/BIG LADDER

Even those with symptoms may miss out on Covid tests

A coronavirus testing priority list has been drawn up. The Telegraph can disclose that people will be refused tests – even if they have symptoms – under rationing plans if the crisis deepens. Routine testing could be restricted to hospitals, care homes, certain key workers and schools. As the UK recorded nearly 4,000 new Covid-19 cases for the first time since May, ministers were poised to announce further lockdown measures – with pub curfews and a ban on household mixing covering two million people in the North East. Read more about the new rules from midnight. Prime Minister Boris Johnson warned a further national curfew may be necessary and schools have plans to go part-time if the testing chaos continues. Matt imagines the rise of

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Here’s How To Support Your Child Emotionally and Academically Through Remote Learning

Photo credit: Roberto Westbrook - Getty Images
Photo credit: Roberto Westbrook – Getty Images

From Woman’s Day

Melissa Bunch’s 7-year-old son Luka starts remote school at 8:30 a.m. every morning. He has a series of Google Meets throughout the day until about 2 p.m. One day, after his last Google Meet, teachers were working with him one-on-one on a phonics assessment, and he broke down. “I’ve never seen him cry like that,” Bunch tells Woman’s Day . “Just crying as he’s trying to spell words.” Remote learning has been emotionally and academically challenging for Luka and Bunch’s fourth-grader Kellan, who both have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and have struggled with staying focused and engaged.

“It’s isolating,” Bunch says. “You’re staring at a screen for eight hours a day.”

Bunch and her kids aren’t alone. Education and psychology experts tell Woman’s Day completing school at home can affect kids’ mental health and development in a variety of

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Schools rarely teach climate change outside of science class. Teachers are changing that.

Schools rarely teach climate change outside of science class. Teachers are changing that.
Schools rarely teach climate change outside of science class. Teachers are changing that.

There’s a pretty good chance you remember all of those early, iconic lessons learned in school, from the fetching utility of Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally to the way your mind was quietly blown with the realization that the green light in The Great Gatsby might be more than just something at the end of a dock.

But what’s the likelihood of that early, iconic lesson being about climate change, a looming global catastrophe that will have devastating consequences without radical, immediate (and thus unprecedented) action?

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Somewhat slim, considering that, at present, there’s no unified climate curriculum for K-12 science education in the United States, as Glenn Branch, deputy director at the National Center for Science Education, an organization that advocates for an accurate science education, points out. As Branch explains, this

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Spotty virus tracking in schools is leaving millions in the dark on infection rates

The data on how coronavirus is spreading at schools and colleges is inconsistent, erratic — and sometimes purposely kept out of the public’s reach.

Federal rules don’t specifically require tracking or reporting the numbers by school or college, despite pressure from President Donald Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos to open schools and colleges for in-person classes. The result is a distorted picture of how and where the virus may be spreading, not just for parents, teachers, students and professors, but the cities and towns where campuses are located.

The plan in Texas was for the state to gather and share data, but the state teachers union said it is launching its own tracker because the Texas education and health departments won’t share any data for a few more weeks. Even then, it won’t break the information down by school. In Florida, the state department of health has told

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