Science Fiction Comes Back With Next-General Graphics

The rumors were right: EA in a remake of the horror classic Dead Space. What players can expect, the developers have released the latest EA. Mention with a short teaser video of the play event. Shown is the pretty scary environment for the next gen hardware, which was created with the Frostbite engine.

That’s why Dead Space was great

In 2008 Dead Space went nowhere, and science fiction snatched it away. In the game, technician Isaac Clark is trapped in the USG Ishimura submarine. The initial rescue mission quickly becomes a struggle for survival because the crew, transformed into necromapers, fight against the newcomers in every possible way.

There is a lot of tension between the struggle for survival, the research on the causes, and the search for Clark’s girlfriend who works at Ishimura. Clark is not a soldier, he is not, but it is enhanced by the fact that

Read More

A Century of Science Fiction That Changed How We Think About the Environment

Even before the idea of climate change took hold, sci-fi began to think of the planet as something that preceded our species and could conceivably continue without us.

It has become axiomatic to say that the world is becoming like science fiction. From mobile phones that speak to us (reminding Star Trek fans of tricorders), to genetically modified foods, to the Internet of Things and the promise of self-driving cars, people in industrialized nations live immersed in technology. Daily life can thus at times seem like visions from the pulp science fiction of the 1920s and 1930s — either a world perfected by technology, manifested in events such as the 1939 World’s Fair, with its theme “The World of Tomorrow”; or a dystopian nightmare, such as Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World” (1932).

If we think about science fiction (sf) in terms of the genre’s connections to pressing issues in

Read More

Five SF Stories About Automated Art

Anxiety over mechanization-driven job loss dates back at least as far as the early days of the industrial revolution. Adding computers to humanity’s tool kit has only exacerbated such concerns. Bad enough that machines could replace muscle power and nimble fingers—if computers could replace essential elements of human cognition as well, what is left for humans to do?

No activity is quite so human as art. Therefore, early computer-age authors looking for particularly poignant examples of mere humans being shoved aside by superior automation might well imagine that art, too, has been automated. And so they did, as these examples show.

 

“The Darfsteller” by Walter M. Miller (1955)

Thanks to advances in the field of robotic acting, Ryan Thornier, former star, is now Ryan Thornier, underpaid theatre janitor. True, there are many occupations not yet automated to which the old man could apply his thespian talents—salesman, politician, general—but these

Read More

What Star Wars And Other Science Fiction Favorites Get Wrong About Space Travel : Short Wave : NPR

This artist concept shows NASA Dawn spacecraft arriving at the dwarf planet Ceres. Dawn travels through space using a technology called ion propulsion, with ions glowing with blue light are accelerated out of an engine, giving the spacecraft thrust.



NASA/JPL-Caltech


hide caption

toggle caption



NASA/JPL-Caltech


This artist concept shows NASA Dawn spacecraft arriving at the dwarf planet Ceres. Dawn travels through space using a technology called ion propulsion, with ions glowing with blue light are accelerated out of an engine, giving the spacecraft thrust.



NASA/JPL-Caltech

Contrary to sci-fi depictions in shows like Iron Man and Star Wars, getting from point A to point B in space is a tough engineering problem. NPR Science Correspondent Geoff Brumfiel, with help from scientist Naia Butler-Craig, explains how space propulsion actually works, and why some new technologies might be needed to get humans to Mars and beyond.

Follow Geoff Brumfiel and Short Wave

Read More