Here’s How To Support Your Child Emotionally and Academically Through Remote Learning

Photo credit: Roberto Westbrook - Getty Images
Photo credit: Roberto Westbrook – Getty Images

From Woman’s Day

Melissa Bunch’s 7-year-old son Luka starts remote school at 8:30 a.m. every morning. He has a series of Google Meets throughout the day until about 2 p.m. One day, after his last Google Meet, teachers were working with him one-on-one on a phonics assessment, and he broke down. “I’ve never seen him cry like that,” Bunch tells Woman’s Day . “Just crying as he’s trying to spell words.” Remote learning has been emotionally and academically challenging for Luka and Bunch’s fourth-grader Kellan, who both have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and have struggled with staying focused and engaged.

“It’s isolating,” Bunch says. “You’re staring at a screen for eight hours a day.”

Bunch and her kids aren’t alone. Education and psychology experts tell Woman’s Day completing school at home can affect kids’ mental health and development in a variety of

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