July 13, 2024

sanairambiente

Science It Works

Windsor Park recognized in nation for computer science competition

For the fifth consecutive year, Windsor Park Elementary School been recognized as top in the nation in the National Continental Math League Computer Science competition.

Additionally, four students were recognized as National Student Leaders for scoring perfect 18/18 individual scores. They include third graders Aiden Kim and Ishaan Debchoudhury, fourth grader Katherine Xu and fifth grader Berea Klaus.

Technology applications teacher and computer science team advisor Gary Henicke said while it is the fifth year the school has had at least one team place first, Windsor Park has won nationally 13 times since 2015, the year the contest started. He said the school has three computer science academic teams for third, fourth and fifth grade.

Third graders Aiden Kim (left) and Ishaan Debchoudhury, fourth grader Katherine Xu and fifth grader Berea Klaus were recognized as National Student Leaders for correctly answering all 18 questions at the National Continental Math League Computer Science competition.

“It is an academic team that students try out for to qualify,” Henicke said. “It is not a ‘computer club.’ Students compete here at school and our assistant principal Catarino Rodriguez submits our scores.”

Henicke said several students only missed one question. They included third grader Avery Mitchell; fourth graders Kennedy James and Allyson Tinana; and fifth graders Annabelle Quaye, Cami Egbert, Elias Chen, Elly Cordova, Ilyasah Masters, Manav Dash, Peyton Porche and Samson Hernandez.

The contest is conducted through Continental Math League, which started the computer science contest six years ago.

An example of one of the questions students were asked in the National Continental Math League Computer Science competition.

“(Continental Math League) has academic contests for just about every subject,” Henicke said. “There are three meets in the contest and the students compete during the school day. Each meet consists of six questions that include computational thinking, logic problems, brain teasers and computer programming language scenarios.”

Henicke said he is proud of all his students because the questions are of at least high school level.