Sharp Malaysia launches smart classroom training programme to support teachers with digital learning in schools

Ting (second left) exchanging the memorandum of understanding with Wan Munadi (second right). With them are (from left) Hashimoto, Maznah and Aminudin. — Picture courtesy of Sharp Electronics Malaysia

Ting (second left) exchanging the memorandum of understanding with Wan Munadi (second right). With them are (from left) Hashimoto, Maznah and Aminudin. — Picture courtesy of Sharp Electronics Malaysia

By Sylvia Looi

Friday, 20 May 2022 12:52 PM MYT

KUALA LUMPUR, May 20 — Sharp Electronics Malaysia has signed a memorandum of understanding with Yayasan Guru Malaysia Berhad (YGMB) that sees the company supporting teachers embrace digital classroom learning through its Smart Classroom Solution training programmes.

The MoU was signed by YGMB chief executive officer Datuk Wan Munadi Wan Mamat, and Sharp Malaysia managing director Ting Yang Chung.

It was witnessed by senior executive managing officer and head of Asia business of Sharp Corporation Japan Yoshihiro Hashimoto, and YGMB chairman Aminudin Adam.

Education Ministry’s educational resources and technology division director Maznah Abu Bakar also attended the ceremony.

Ting said Sharp Malaysia strives to leverage its advanced technology and continue to

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