Hands on learning: Hands on learning | News

Students and teachers are adapting to a changing environment this year as the field of education tries to manage the COVID-19 pandemic. Distance and hybrid learning means a lot of subjects that depend on hands-on work aren’t getting that valuable in-person learning time. Luckily for Kennedy Secondary School science teacher Ted Kohorst, 544 Education Foundation stepped up to help his students engage in hands-on learning digitally by helping to fund a subscription to Gizmos.

Gizmos, by ExploreLearning, are interactive math and science simulations that span subjects like how to build topographic maps or create circuits, as well as explaining things like magnetic induction and energy of a pendulum.

“Last spring we used it and they had the kids build a simulated digestive system, and they had to work their way through it and at the end they got to send burgers and food through it, and it told them, ‘You

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Nobel Prizes and COVID-19: Slow, Basic Science May Pay Off | World News

By SETH BORENSTEIN, AP Science Writer

While the world wants flashy quick fixes for everything, especially massive threats like the coronavirus and global warming, next week’s Nobel Prizes remind us that in science, slow and steady pays off.

Science builds upon previous work, with thinkers “standing on the shoulders of giants,” as Isaac Newton put it, and it starts with basic research aimed at understanding a problem before fixing it. It’s that type of basic science that the Nobels usually reward, often years or decades after a discovery, because it can take that long to realize the implications.

Slow and steady success in science has made researchers hopeful in the fight against the pandemic. It even offers a glimmer of climate optimism.

Many years of advances in basic molecular science, some of them already Nobel Prize-winning, have given the world tools for fast virus identification and speeded up the development

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